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Managing Diabetes
 

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Learn About Diabetes
What is Diabetes?
What is blood glucose?
Symptoms of Uncontrolled Diabetes
How To Better Manage Complications
Manage Diabetes with Diet
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How can you successfully manage your Diabetes with diet?

Food is one of the main factors that directly impacts blood glucose levels - and one you can control. There is not one "diabetes diet" for everyone to follow. Instead, people with diabetes should have a varied, flexible meal plan based on their lifestyle and personal needs. The key is to know how foods, especially the foods you like to eat, impact your blood glucose levels. As long as you eat a balanced meal plan, you can eat nearly all of the things you enjoy, at least occasionally.

When you were diagnosed with diabetes, you may have wondered, "Will I have to give up my favorite foods?" Your meal plan is not about depriving yourself of all the things you want; it's about maintaining a good blood glucose level and having a well-rounded meal plan. By making healthy choices, your body will feel its best and your blood glucose levels are most likely to stay in control.

Carbohydrates:

A carbohydrate (or "carb") is a sugar molecule "chain" that the body uses for fuel. Carbohydrates are found in nearly every food item and include starches, sugars and fiber. All carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels.

Our bodies convert many food nutrients to glucose, which is the fuel that runs our bodies. With carbs, this conversion process happens much faster than with other nutrients - usually within two hours. This is why people with diabetes have to pay close attention to the foods they eat to help control their blood glucose levels.

When it comes to glucose control, it may seem as if all carbs are the same. But for better health and energy, you should choose "high octane" carbs - those with more vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Foods like:

  • Whole grains breads and cereals
  • Dried beans, lentils, and legumes
  • Crackers and cookies with less than 3 grams of fat
  • Low-fat or skim milk and dairy products
  • Fresh fruits and juices and canned fruits made without added sugar

   
 

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